What are the two most frequently asked questions by our patients before receiving anesthesia?

Updated: Nov 5


Without exception the most common questions we are asked by our patients is will I be in pain, and will I throw up after my anesthesia? Both concerns are valid based on years of prior experiences that our patients and parents have had. Luckily, several factors associated with anesthesia for dental patients can significantly reduce the likelihood of experiencing significant pain or vomiting.


Adult patients who receive dental or oral surgical procedures frequently receive local anesthetics [novocaine] by the treating doctor and therefore wake up with numbness and minimal to no pain. We routinely discuss the plan for pain management with our dental and surgical colleagues during the procedure to ensure we are utilizing appropriate pain medications and that the local anesthetic will be present at the end of the procedure. Children receiving an anesthetic are rarely given local anesthetics, even for tooth removal, and do not experience significant pain following extraction of children’s teeth. Using local anesthetics for tooth extraction with resultant numbness creates greater agitation in children and is to be avoided.


The anesthesia agents we most commonly utilize have a very low incidence of vomiting compared to years past. Rather than using a gas anesthetic for our procedures, we administer a primarily intravenous anesthetic. To ensure that our patients do not experience vomiting upon waking up we routinely administer several antiemetic or anti-vomiting medications during the anesthetic.


We have found these strategies to be very effective for both our adult and pediatric patients and would be happy to address this further with you.

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